Law student at Olympics; Prof issues strict classroom rules

It was a GOOD week for…

Law student representation at the Olympics, after Boston College Law School student Caitlin Cahow served on the American delegation for the opening ceremony at the Sochi Winter Olympics in Russia. Cahow, who competed for the United States women’s hockey team in 2006 in Torino and Vancouver in 2010, was selected by the Obama administration as one of three openly gay former athletes. “I’m hoping that by being out about who I am, and supporting other LGBT athletes and allies, that I’m encouraging others to be open and honest, and to share the gift of being open and honest with the world,” Cahow said. 

It was a BAD week for…

Class participation, after a Santa Clara University professor offered strict “local rules” for his classroom. Professor Ray Bernstein created a set of rules that he acknowledged “may seem harsh or ridiculous.” One such rule called “contempt of class” encourages students to act respectfully in the classroom, and threatens a grade reduction or a lessened chance of a positive recommendation if students act disrespectfully. Bernstein, who teaches Legal Analysis, Research and Writing, created the rules to provide students notice of his expectations, and the consequences of not following the rules. Bernstein’s rules also encourage good proofreading, timeliness and professionalism.