Tuition freeze at U. St. Thomas; lower tuition at U. Iowa; Lawsuit at Case Western

It was a GOOD week for…

An affordable legal education, after two schools announced tuition would not increase next year. The University of St. Thomas School of Law in Minneapolis announced it would freeze tuition again for three years at $36,843 per year. The law school has not raised tuition since the fall of 2012. The tuition freeze reflects the growing concern about the cost of a legal education and the decline in law school applications throughout the past three years. As of the summer 2012, the University of St. Thomas had 59 percent fewer applications than in 2010. “We need to do whatever we can to keep the cost of legal education under control,” Robert Vischer, the dean of the law school told the Star Tribune. Current students will appreciate the tuition freeze as well.

The University of Iowa announced it planned to lower tuition for non-residents — dropping it from $47,252 to $39,500. The school's goal is to "boost applications and restore class size to prerecession levels," documents show. The school saw a 20 percent drop in applicaitons this year. In-state tuition would increase by $474, or 1.8 percent. Gradute law students from out of state could see tuition cut even more — by nearly in half to $24,000.

It was a BAD week for ...

Collegiality among deans, after a former associate dean sued his law school for retaliation after he reported potential sexual harassment by the dean. Professor Raymond Ku claims Case Western Reserve University stripped him of his associate deanship after he brought allegations about Dean Lawrence Mitchell. He claimed that Mitchell harassed a female staff member and made inappropriate comments to other professors. Ku remains a full-time tenured faculty member at the law school, making it a chilly atmosphere